Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to the page's main content

Complete Health Indicator Report of Physical Activity: Recommended Muscle-strengthening Among Adults

Definition

Percentage of adults aged 18 years and older who reported doing muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days of the week.

Numerator

Number of adults aged 18 years and older who reported doing muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days of the week.

Denominator

Number of surveyed adults aged 18 years and older.

Data Interpretation Issues

This question was first asked on BRFSS in 2011. In 2011, the BRFSS changed its methodology from a landline only sample and weighting based on post-stratification to a landline/cell phone sample and raking as the weighting methodology. Raking accounts for variables such as income, education, marital status, and home ownership during weighting and has the potential to more accurately reflect the population distribution. More details about these changes can be found at: [https://ibis.health.utah.gov/pdf/opha/resource/brfss/RakingImpact2011.pdf].

Why Is This Important?

The benefits of muscle-strengthening activities include improved bone health, reduced risk of falls in older adults, improved daily energy and sleep, and improved posture. Muscle-strengthening activities also help prevent diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

Healthy People Objective: Increase the proportion of adults who perform muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days of the week

U.S. Target: 24.1 percent

How Are We Doing?

The first BRFSS data on muscle-strengthening activity became available in 2011. The age-adjusted rate for 2011 was 31.4%, In 2019, the rate s increased to 38.0%.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Compared to the nation, Utah adults report doing more muscle-strengthening activity. In 2019, 38.0% of Utah adults reported doing muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days of the week (age-adjusted). In 2019, the national rate was 35.6%.

What Is Being Done?

The Utah Department of Health and Human Service's Healthy Environments Active Living (HEAL) Program plays a key role in improving the health of residents in the state of Utah. The program was initially formed in July 2013 (as the Healthy Living through Environment, Policy, and Improved Clinical Care Program, or ?EPICC?). HEAL was restructured in 2021 as part of a strategic planning process and the new program model focuses on the social determinants of health while advancing health equity and increasing policy, systems and environmental changes. HEAL works: In schools:[[br]] HEAL encourages schools to adopt the Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program. This framework encourages students to be physically active for 60 minutes a day through school, home, and community activities. HEAL also tracks height and weight trends in elementary school students. In worksites:[[br]] HEAL offers training on developing worksite wellness programs called Work@Health. HEAL partners with local health departments to encourage worksites to complete the CDC Scorecard and participate in yearly health risk assessments for their employees. HEAL provides toolkits and other resources for employers interested in implementing wellness programs [https://heal.health.utah.gov/worksite-wellness/] In communities:[[br]] HEAL receives federal funding to partner with worksites and community-based organizations to increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables in community settings and worksites. HEAlL also partners with LHDs to work with cities and/or counties within their jurisdictions to create a built environment that encourages physical activity. In healthcare:[[br]] HEAL works with health care systems to establish community clinical linkages to support individuals at risk for or diagnosed with diabetes or hypertension to engage in lifestyle change programs such as chronic disease self-management and diabetes prevention programs. In childcare:[[br]] HEAL works with state and local partners through the Childcare Obesity Prevention workgroup to implement policy and systems changes in early care and education across agencies statewide. Ten local health departments statewide have implemented the TOP Star program, which aims to improve the nutrition, physical activity, and breastfeeding environments and achieve best practices in childcare centers and homes.[[br]]

Evidence-based Practices

The HEAL program promotes evidence based practices collected by the Center TRT. The Center for Training and Research Translation (Center TRT) bridges the gap between research and practice and supports the efforts of public health practitioners working in nutrition, physical activity, and obesity prevention by: *Reviewing evidence of public health impact and disseminating population-level interventions; *Designing and providing practice-relevant training both in-person and web-based; *Addressing social determinants of health and health equity through training and translation efforts; and, *Providing guidance on evaluating policies and programs aimed at impacting healthy eating and physical activity.[[br]] [[br]] Appropriate evidence based interventions can be found at: [http://www.centertrt.org/?p=interventions_interventions_overview]

Available Services

Visit [http://heal.health.utah.gov] for more information. One aspect of chronic disease management is regular physical activity. Lifestyle change program information can be found here [https://heal.health.utah.gov/diabetes/]

Health Program Information

Overarching Goals: Healthy People: Increase access to resources that empower all people in Utah to reach their full health potential. Healthy Communities: Increase the capacity of communities to support and promote healthy living for all individuals. Equitable Society: Increase opportunities for people who are under-resourced and under-represented in Utah to live healthy and thriving lives.


Related Indicators

Relevant Population Characteristics

There are age, gender, and socio-economic related risk factors associated with engaging in muscle strengthening activity.

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Health Care System Factors

Health care system factors relate to access to care and a reported low rate of health care provider counseling for physical activity recommendations Communication between patients and their physicians may be an opportunity to encourage patients to increase physical activity including muscle strengthening.

Related Health Care System Factors Indicators:


Risk Factors

Low education and being female are associated with lower rates of participation in recommended amount of muscle-strengthening activity.

Related Risk Factors Indicators:


Health Status Outcomes

Progressive muscle-strengthening activities increase or preserve muscle mass, strength, and power. Higher amounts (through greater frequency or higher weights) improve muscle function.

Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

Recommended Amount of Muscle-strengthening Activity, Utah and U.S. Adults Aged 18+, 2011, 2013, 2015, 2017 and 2019

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

The percentage of adults meeting the recommended amount of muscle-strengthening activity is consistently higher in Utah than for the U.S. but the difference is slight.
Utah vs. U.S.YearAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 10
Utah201131.4%30.3%32.5%
Utah201331.5%30.4%32.6%
Utah201534.1%32.9%35.2%
Utah201732.8%31.7%34.0%
Utah201938.0%36.1%39.1%
U.S.201129.3%29.1%29.6%
U.S.201329.6%29.3%29.9%
U.S.201530.4%30.1%30.7%
U.S.201730.5%30.2%30.8%
U.S.201935.6%35.2%35.9%

Data Notes

In 2016, Utah BRFSS modified its methodology for age adjustment for increased precision. With this change Utah is consistent with both the U.S. and other states using IBIS. Charts have been updated from 2011 forward to reflect this change.   Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 population.

Data Sources

  • The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)
  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, US Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).


Recommended Amount of Muscle-strengthening Activity by Gender and Age Group, Utah Adults Aged 18+, 2019

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Meeting recommended amount of muscle-strengthening activity was highest among the youngest adults aged 18-34, for both males and females.
Males vs. FemalesAge GroupPercentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 12
Male18-3447.2%44.2%50.3%
Male35-4937.9%34.8%41.2%
Male50-6435.9%32.7%39.2%
Male65+38.2%35.1%41.3%
Female18-3439.4%36.1%42.8%
Female35-4934.3%31.4%37.3%
Female50-6433.2%30.1%36.5%
Female65+33.5%30.7%36.5%
Total18-3443.4%41.1%45.7%
Total35-4936.1%34.0%38.3%
Total50-6434.5%32.3%36.9%
Total65+35.7%33.6%37.9%

Data Notes

In 2016, Utah BRFSS modified its methodology for age adjustment for increased precision. With this change Utah is consistent with both the U.S. and other states using IBIS. Charts have been updated from 2011 forward to reflect this change.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Recommended Amount of Muscle-strengthening Activity by Ethnicity, Utah Adults Aged 18+, 2019

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Hispanic adults had lower rates of meeting the recommended amount of muscle-strengthening than non-Hispanic adults and Utah adults overall.
Hispanic EthnicityAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 3
Hispanic/Latino33.8%30.1%37.8%
Non-Hispanic/Latino38.7%37.5%39.9%
All Ethnicities38.0%36.8%39.1%

Data Notes

In 2016, Utah BRFSS modified its methodology for age adjustment for increased precision. With this change Utah is consistent with both the U.S. and other states using IBIS. Charts have been updated from 2011 forward to reflect this change.   Age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Recommended Amount of Muscle-strengthening Activity by Race, Utah Adults Aged 18+, 2017 & 2019

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

African American/Black adult had the highest rate of engaging in the recommended amount of muscle-strengthening activity.
Race/EthnicityAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 7
American Indian, Alaskan Native40.9%33.9%48.2%
Asian36.9%29.7%44.9%
Black, African American45.8%36.4%55.6%
Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander42.2%31.8%53.3%
White35.7%34.8%36.6%
Other30.4%27.0%34.0%
All Races/Ethnicities35.6%34.8%36.4%

Data Notes

In 2016, Utah BRFSS modified its methodology for age adjustment for increased precision. With this change Utah is consistent with both the U.S. and other states using IBIS. Charts have been updated from 2011 forward to reflect this change.   Age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population based on 3 age groups: 18-34, 35-49, and 50+.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Recommended Amount of Muscle-strengthening Activity by Local Health District, Utah, 2019

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

All local health districts were within six percentage points of the state rate of 32.8%. Summit County Local Health District continues to have a higher rate compared to the state total. (Prior years available in [https://ibis.health.utah.gov/query/builder/brfss/LandlineCellAgeAdj5_Muscle/Muscle.html IBIS Query].)
Local Health DistrictAge-adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 18+Lower LimitUpper LimitNote
Record Count: 14
Bear River38.5%34.0%43.1%
Central37.0%31.7%42.6%
Davis County40.9%37.4%44.6%
Salt Lake County37.3%35.3%39.4%
San Juan25.2%17.4%34.9%Lower than the state
Southeast31.0%24.8%38.1%
Southwest38.9%34.8%43.2%
Summit44.8%36.5%53.4%
Tooele33.8%27.9%40.2%
TriCounty43.0%37.6%48.5%
Utah County37.3%34.9%39.8%
Wasatch34.7%26.8%43.6%
Weber-Morgan38.9%35.0%43.0%
State of Utah38.0%36.8%39.1%

Data Notes

In 2016, Utah BRFSS modified its methodology for age adjustment for increased precision. With this change Utah is consistent with both the U.S. and other states using IBIS. Charts have been updated from 2011 forward to reflect this change.   Age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Recommended Amount of Muscle-strengthening Activity by Utah Small Area, Adults Aged 18+, 2017 & 2019

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

In 2017, the number of Utah Small Areas was expanded from 64 to 99, to allow for a more meaningful analysis at the smallest possible unit. Previous data by Utah Small Area has been updated to reflect all 99 Utah Small Areas.[[br]] [[br]] Small areas with rates of engagement in the recommended amount of muscle-strengthening activity that are significantly higher or lower than the state are show in the table below.
Utah Small AreasAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper LimitNote
Record Count: 100
Brigham City38.0%29.9%46.9%
Box Elder Co (Other) V227.5%18.4%39.0%
Tremonton38.8%28.7%49.9%
Logan V238.1%32.5%44.1%
North Logan32.5%23.9%42.4%
Cache (Other)/Rich (All) V244.1%35.5%53.0%Higher than the state
Hyrum24.0%13.7%38.4%
Smithfield36.8%25.6%49.5%
Ben Lomond32.3%26.7%38.4%
Weber County (East)44.8%37.1%52.7%Higher than the state
Morgan County50.1%36.0%64.3%Higher than the state
Ogden (Downtown)28.5%22.4%35.5%
South Ogden32.0%25.6%39.1%
Roy/Hooper28.7%22.6%35.6%
Riverdale40.2%32.0%49.0%
Clearfield Area/Hooper39.9%34.0%46.1%
Layton/South Weber39.3%34.1%44.7%
Kaysville/Fruit Heights41.3%33.8%49.2%
Syracuse34.8%25.4%45.6%
Centerville39.9%29.9%50.9%
Farmington42.1%31.5%53.5%
North Salt Lake31.8%22.7%42.5%
Woods Cross/West Bountiful45.8%33.5%58.8%
Bountiful39.0%32.2%46.3%
SLC (Rose Park)19.3%13.6%26.8%Lower than the state
SLC (Avenues)37.4%28.2%47.6%
SLC (Foothill/East Bench)47.0%36.0%58.3%Higher than the state
Magna29.6%22.2%38.2%
SLC (Glendale) V236.9%26.1%49.1%
West Valley (Center)29.3%23.0%36.4%
West Valley (West) V226.2%19.3%34.5%Lower than the stte
West Valley (East) V228.9%21.9%36.9%
SLC (Downtown) V237.2%30.0%45.1%
SLC (Southeast Liberty)31.3%22.1%42.2%
South Salt Lake23.7%16.6%32.8%Lower than the state
SLC (Sugar House)42.6%34.9%50.7%
Millcreek (South)44.3%35.1%53.9%
Millcreek (East)34.3%25.4%44.5%
Holladay V242.4%32.5%53.0%
Cottonwood37.0%29.1%45.6%
Kearns V225.0%18.4%32.9%Lower than the state
Taylorsville (E)/Murray (W)35.8%28.7%43.5%
Taylorsville (West)38.4%30.0%47.6%
Murray37.8%29.6%46.8%
Midvale32.1%23.8%41.7%
West Jordan (Northeast) V239.2%29.9%49.3%
West Jordan (Southeast)37.9%30.9%45.4%
West Jordan (W)/Copperton43.4%34.5%52.8%
South Jordan V238.8%31.5%46.8%
Daybreak37.4%28.7%46.9%
Sandy (West)44.4%35.0%54.2%
Sandy (Center) V240.1%31.8%49.0%
Sandy (Northeast)34.1%24.5%45.3%
Sandy (Southeast)49.0%38.8%59.2%Higher than the state
Draper41.0%32.7%49.9%
Riverton/Bluffdale28.0%21.6%35.3%Lower than the state
Herriman41.3%33.7%49.4%
Tooele County (Other)37.3%29.4%45.9%
Tooele Valley33.3%28.4%38.6%
Eagle Mountain/Cedar Valley35.2%27.1%44.2%
Lehi34.4%28.8%40.6%
Saratoga Springs32.4%24.8%41.0%
American Fork35.8%29.9%42.1%
Alpine51.8%38.8%64.6%Higher than the state
Pleasant Grove/Lindon39.0%33.2%45.1%
Orem (North)32.4%25.7%39.9%
Orem (West)38.2%30.7%46.2%
Orem (East)34.8%26.5%44.3%
Provo/BYU37.7%30.9%44.9%
Provo (West City Center)30.1%22.5%39.1%
Provo (East City Center)34.0%24.6%44.8%
Salem City38.1%27.2%50.4%
Spanish Fork33.2%26.8%40.3%
Springville27.5%20.4%36.0%
Mapleton46.2%35.0%57.9%
Utah County (South) V227.9%17.7%41.2%
Payson24.9%18.3%32.9%Lower than the state
Park City42.3%34.0%51.1%
Summit County (East)42.5%34.0%51.5%
Wasatch County35.8%29.4%42.7%
Daggett and Uintah County33.2%28.8%37.9%
Duchesne County39.4%33.8%45.4%
Nephi/Mona33.1%22.2%46.1%
Delta/Fillmore30.5%22.2%40.4%
Sanpete Valley35.8%28.4%43.9%
Central (Other)30.5%24.6%37.3%
Richfield/Monroe/Salina40.8%33.5%48.5%
Carbon County27.4%21.7%33.9%Lower than the state
Emery County27.8%19.6%37.8%
Grand County40.6%32.1%49.7%
Blanding/Monticello30.0%23.0%38.2%
San Juan County (Other)25.5%14.7%40.5%
St. George35.6%30.5%40.9%
Washington Co (Other) V226.4%17.6%37.5%
Washington City40.6%31.8%50.1%
Hurricane/La Verkin39.5%29.2%51.0%
Ivins/Santa Clara29.1%18.3%42.8%
Cedar City44.8%38.0%51.8%Higher than the state
Southwest LHD (Other)25.9%19.3%33.9%Lower than the state
State of Utah35.5%34.6%36.3%

Data Notes

In 2016, Utah BRFSS modified its methodology for age adjustment for increased precision. With this change Utah is consistent with both the U.S. and other states using IBIS. Charts have been updated from 2011 forward to reflect this change.   Age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 standard population.[[br]] [[br]] A description of the Utah Small Areas may be found on the Methodology and Guidelines page: [https://ibis.health.utah.gov/resource/Guidelines.html].

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Recommended Amount of Muscle-strengthening Activity by Income, Utah, 2019

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Adults in households with higher income levels have higher rates of engaging in the recommended amount of muscle-strengthening activity than adults in households with lower income levels.
Income CategoryAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 5
<$25,00031.4%28.2%34.7%
$25,000-$49,99934.1%31.3%36.9%
$50,000-$74,99939.3%36.5%42.3%
$75,000+42.8%40.9%44.8%
Total38.0%36.8%39.1%

Data Notes

In 2016, Utah BRFSS modified its methodology for age adjustment for increased precision. With this change Utah is consistent with both the U.S. and other states using IBIS. Charts have been updated from 2011 forward to reflect this change.   Age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Recommended Amount of Muscle-Strengthening Activity by Education, Utah Adults 25+, 2019

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Rates of meeting the recommended amount of muscle-strengthening activity increased with education level.
Education LevelAge-adjusted Percentage of Adults 25+Lower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 5
Less Than High School25.0%20.3%30.3%
H.S. Grad or G.E.D.32.3%29.9%34.9%
Some Post High School37.0%34.9%39.1%
College Graduate42.9%41.1%44.6%
Total36.9%35.7%38.1%

Data Notes

In 2016, Utah BRFSS modified its methodology for age adjustment for increased precision. With this change Utah is consistent with both the U.S. and other states using IBIS. Charts have been updated from 2011 forward to reflect this change.   Age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)


Recommended Amount of Muscle-strengthening Activity by Sex, Utah, 2019

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Males have higher rates of recommended muscle-strengthening activity than females. Note these rates are age-adjusted. An earlier graph, showing rates by age and sex, uses crude rates.
SexAge-adjusted Percentage of AdultsLower LimitUpper Limit
Record Count: 3
Male40.4%38.8%42.0%
Female35.5%33.9%37.2%
All38.0%36.8%39.1%

Data Notes

In 2016, Utah BRFSS modified its methodology for age adjustment for increased precision. With this change Utah is consistent with both the U.S. and other states using IBIS. Charts have been updated from 2011 forward to reflect this change.   Age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Data Source

The Utah Department of Health and Human Services Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

References and Community Resources

National Physical Activity Recommendations:[[br]] [http://www.health.gov/paguidelines/][[br]] [http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/index.html] CDC's Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity: [http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao] The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has extensive resources on physical activity for patients, health care providers, and general consumers: [http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov] The CDC's Prevention Research Centers provide resources and information about physical activity to researchers, public health practitioners, and others who are interested in promoting physical activity in their communities: [http://www.cdc.gov/prc/] More information on the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System may be found on the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - [http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/] __References:__[[br]] 1. Knowler WC, Barrett-Connor E, Fowler SE, Hamman RF, Lachin JM, et al. Reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes with lifestyle intervention or metformin. ''N Engl J Med'' 2002;346(6):393-403.[[br]] 2. Kesaniemi, Y., et al. (1994). Dose-response issues concerning physical activity and health: an evidence-based symposium. ''Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise'', 33(6 suppl), S351-S358[[br]] 3. 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans: Chapter 2. [http://www.health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/chapter2.aspx]

More Resources and Links

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Page Content Updated On 10/26/2022, Published on 11/14/2022
The information provided above is from the Utah Department of Health's Center for Health Data IBIS-PH web site (http://epht.health.utah.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sat, 25 May 2024 23:15:15 from Utah Department of Health, Center for Health Data, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://epht.health.utah.gov ".

Content updated: Mon, 14 Nov 2022 12:21:30 MST